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Poverty and Median Income in the United States 2001-2002

Poverty and Median Income in the United States 2001-2002

Metadata also available as - [Outline] - [Parseable text] - [XML] - [DIF]

Frequently-anticipated questions:


What does this data set describe?

Title: Poverty and Median Income in the United States 2001-2002
Abstract:
This map layer shows estimates of the percentage of people in poverty and estimates of median household income, for counties in the United States, for the years 2001 and 2002. It is drawn from the Small Area Income and Poverty Estimates data compiled by the United States Census Bureau. The poverty data are provided for three groups: all ages, ages 0-17, and related children ages 5-17 in families in poverty. These estimates are used for the administration of Federal programs and the allocation of Federal funds to local jurisdictions.

Supplemental_Information:
To create the maps in the National Atlas Map Maker, <http://nationalatlas.gov/natlas/natlasstart.asp>, pv9800t.dbf was joined to the 2001 county boundaries available from the National Atlas raw data download page, <http://nationalatlas.gov/atlasftp.html>.

The data originally came from the U.S. Census Bureau's Small Area Income and Poverty Estimates, <http://www.census.gov/hhes/www/saipe/tables.html>.

Statistical models are used to create the estimates. Although the official national estimates of income and poverty come directly from the Annual Social and Economic Supplement (ASEC) of the Current Population Survey (CPS), its sample is not large enough to provide reliable single-year direct estimates for all States and counties.

The statistical models used relate income and poverty to indicators based on summary data from Federal income tax returns, data about participation in the Food Stamp program, data about participation in the Supplemental Security Income program, economic data from the Bureau of Economic Analysis (BEA), and the most recent census. These estimates are then combined with direct estimates based on the CPS ASEC sample to provide figures which are more precise than either set alone. This is a standard method for making statistical estimates for small areas. The final combined estimates are referred as "model-based."

Poverty status is defined by family; either everyone in the family is in poverty or no one in the family is in poverty. Poverty income thresholds are dollar amounts used to determine poverty status, and vary depending on the number of people in the family, the number of related children under 18, and whether the primary householder is over age 65. An income threshold is determined given a particular family's set of characteristics; if that family's income is below that threshold, the family is in poverty.

  1. How should this data set be cited?

    National Atlas of the United States, 200512, Poverty and Median Income in the United States 2001-2002: National Atlas of the United States, Reston, VA.

    Online Links:

  2. What geographic area does the data set cover?

    West_Bounding_Coordinate: 170
    East_Bounding_Coordinate: -66
    North_Bounding_Coordinate: 72
    South_Bounding_Coordinate: 18

  3. What does it look like?

  4. Does the data set describe conditions during a particular time period?

    Beginning_Date: 2001
    Ending_Date: 2002
    Currentness_Reference: Ground condition

  5. What is the general form of this data set?

  6. How does the data set represent geographic features?

    1. How are geographic features stored in the data set?

      Indirect_Spatial_Reference:
      U.S. Department of Commerce, 1987, Codes for the Identification of the States, the District of Columbia and the Outlying Areas of the United States, and Associated Areas (FIPS 5-2): Washington, DC, National Institute of Standards and Technology.

    2. What coordinate system is used to represent geographic features?

  7. How does the data set describe geographic features?

    Poverty and median household income statistics (described by pv9800t.dbf)
    Table of estimates of poverty rates and median household income for counties and equivalent entities of the United States. (Source: National Atlas of the United States)

    Fips
    The 5-digit FIPS code of the county or county equivalent. (Source: National Atlas of the United States)

    Formal codeset
    Codeset Name:Counties and Equivalent Entities of the United States, Its Possessions, and Associated Areas; (Federal Information Processing Standard (FIPS) 6-4): Washington, DC, National Institute of Standards and Technology.
    Codeset Source:U.S. Department of Commerce

    State
    The 2-character FIPS code of the State or State equivalent. (Source: National Atlas of the United States)

    Formal codeset
    Codeset Name:Codes for the Identification of the States, the District of Columbia and the Outlying Areas of the United States, and Associated Areas, FIPS 5-2.
    Codeset Source:U.S. Department of Commerce, National Institute of Standards and Technology

    County
    The name of the county or county equivalent. (Source: National Atlas of the United States)

    Formal codeset
    Codeset Name:Counties and Equivalent Entities of the United States, Its Possessions, and Associated Areas; (Federal Information Processing Standard (FIPS) 6-4): Washington, DC, National Institute of Standards and Technology.
    Codeset Source:U.S. Department of Commerce

    All_age_01
    For the year 2001, the percentage of people of all ages who were below the poverty threshold. Poverty status is defined by family; either everyone in the family is in poverty or no one in the family is in poverty. Poverty income thresholds are dollar amounts used to determine poverty status and vary depending on the number of people in the family, the number of related children under 18, and whether the primary householder is over age 65. An income threshold is determined given a particular family's set of characteristics; if that family's income is below that threshold, the family is in poverty. (Source: National Atlas of the United States)

    ValueDefinition
    -9999.00No data

    Range of values
    Minimum:2.60
    Maximum:60.10

    Age0_17_01
    For the year 2001, the percentage of people ages 0-17 who were below the poverty threshold. Poverty status is defined by family; either everyone in the family is in poverty or no one in the family is in poverty. Poverty income thresholds are dollar amounts used to determine poverty status and vary depending on the number of people in the family, the number of related children under 18, and whether the primary householder is over age 65. An income threshold is determined given a particular family's set of characteristics; if that family's income is below that threshold, the family is in poverty. (Source: National Atlas of the United States)

    ValueDefinition
    -9999.00No data

    Range of values
    Minimum:2.80
    Maximum:96.90

    Rel5_17_01
    For the year 2001, the percentage of related children ages 5-17 in families which were below the poverty threshold. Poverty status is defined by family; either everyone in the family is in poverty or no one in the family is in poverty. Poverty income thresholds are dollar amounts used to determine poverty status and vary depending on the number of people in the family, the number of related children under 18, and whether the primary householder is over age 65. An income threshold is determined given a particular family's set of characteristics; if that family's income is below that threshold, the family is in poverty. (Source: National Atlas of the United States)

    ValueDefinition
    -9999.00No data

    Range of values
    Minimum:2.60
    Maximum:83.00

    Med_inc_01
    Median household income for the year 2001. The median is the middle value when all values are arranged from highest to lowest. (Source: National Atlas of the United States)

    ValueDefinition
    -9999.00No data

    Range of values
    Minimum:16791.00
    Maximum:100382.00

    All_age_02
    For the year 2002, the percentage of people of all ages who were below the poverty threshold. Poverty status is defined by family; either everyone in the family is in poverty or no one in the family is in poverty. Poverty income thresholds are dollar amounts used to determine poverty status and vary depending on the number of people in the family, the number of related children under 18, and whether the primary householder is over age 65. An income threshold is determined given a particular family's set of characteristics; if that family's income is below that threshold, the family is in poverty. (Source: National Atlas of the United States)

    ValueDefinition
    -9999.00No data

    Range of values
    Minimum:2.30
    Maximum:49.10

    Age0_17_02
    For the year 2002, the percentage of people ages 0-17 who were below the poverty threshold. Poverty status is defined by family; either everyone in the family is in poverty or no one in the family is in poverty. Poverty income thresholds are dollar amounts used to determine poverty status and vary depending on the number of people in the family, the number of related children under 18, and whether the primary householder is over age 65. An income threshold is determined given a particular family's set of characteristics; if that family's income is below that threshold, the family is in poverty. (Source: National Atlas of the United States)

    ValueDefinition
    -9999.00No data

    Range of values
    Minimum:2.20
    Maximum:51.30

    Rel5_17_02
    For the year 2002, the percentage of related children ages 5-17 in families which were below the poverty threshold. Poverty status is defined by family; either everyone in the family is in poverty or no one in the family is in poverty. Poverty income thresholds are dollar amounts used to determine poverty status and vary depending on the number of people in the family, the number of related children under 18, and whether the primary householder is over age 65. An income threshold is determined given a particular family's set of characteristics; if that family's income is below that threshold, the family is in poverty. (Source: National Atlas of the United States)

    ValueDefinition
    -9999.00No data

    Range of values
    Minimum:1.90
    Maximum:52.10

    Med_inc_02
    Median household income for the year 2002. The median is the middle value when all values are arranged from highest to lowest. (Source: National Atlas of the United States)

    ValueDefinition
    -9999.00No data

    Range of values
    Minimum:15025.00
    Maximum:93927.00


Who produced the data set?

  1. Who are the originators of the data set? (may include formal authors, digital compilers, and editors)

    • National Atlas of the United States

  2. Who also contributed to the data set?

  3. To whom should users address questions about the data?

    Gita Urban-Mathieux
    National Atlas of the United States
    12201 Sunrise Valley Dr
    Reston, VA 20192

    703-648-5175 (voice)
    atlasmail@usgs.gov


Why was the data set created?

These data are intended for geographic display and analysis at the national level, and for large regional areas. The data should be displayed and analyzed at scales appropriate for 1:2,000,000-scale data. No responsibility is assumed by the National Atlas of the United States or the U.S. Census Bureau in the use of these data.


How was the data set created?

  1. From what previous works were the data drawn?

    Poverty and Income (source 1 of 1)
    U.S. Census Bureau, 2004, Small Area Income and Poverty Estimates: U.S. Census Bureau, Washington, DC.

    Online Links:

    Type_of_Source_Media: Online
    Source_Contribution: Spatial and attribute information

  2. How were the data generated, processed, and modified?

    Date: Aug-2005 (process 1 of 1)
    Two tab-delimited text files for 2001 and 2002 were downloaded from the U.S. Census Bureau. The text files were loaded into Excel and output in dBASE IV format, then loaded into ArcView for processing. State and County FIPS code fields were combined into one FIPS field and were converted to text. The attribute names were modified and the two files were joined into a singe dBASE IV file. Zero and blank values for Kalawao County, HI were changed to -9999.

    Data sources used in this process:

    • Poverty and Income

  3. What similar or related data should the user be aware of?


How reliable are the data; what problems remain in the data set?

  1. How well have the observations been checked?

  2. How accurate are the geographic locations?

  3. How accurate are the heights or depths?

  4. Where are the gaps in the data? What is missing?

    This map layer includes 2001-2002 poverty and median household income statistics for counties in the United States and the District of Columbia.

  5. How consistent are the relationships among the observations, including topology?

    No checks for logical consistency were performed on this map layer.


How can someone get a copy of the data set?

Are there legal restrictions on access or use of the data?

Access_Constraints: None
Use_Constraints:
None. Acknowledgment of the National Atlas of the United States of America and (or) the U.S. Census Bureau would be appreciated in products derived from these data.

  1. Who distributes the data set? (Distributor 1 of 1)

    Earth Science Information Center, U.S. Geological Survey
    507 National Center
    Reston, VA 20192

    1-888-ASK-USGS (1-888-275-8747) (voice)

    Contact_Instructions:
    In addition to the address above there are other ESIC offices throughout the country. A full list of these offices is at <http://geography.usgs.gov/esic/esic_index.html>.
  2. What's the catalog number I need to order this data set?

  3. What legal disclaimers am I supposed to read?

    Although these data have been processed successfully on a computer system at the U.S. Geological Survey, no warranty expressed or implied is made by the U.S. Geological Survey regarding the utility of the data on any other system, nor shall the act of distribution constitute any such warranty. No responsibility is assumed by the U.S. Geological Survey in the use of these data.

  4. How can I download or order the data?


Who wrote the metadata?

Dates:
Last modified: 07-Oct-2005
Metadata author:
Peg Rawson
National Atlas of the United States
12201 Sunrise Valley Drive
Reston, VA 20192

703-648-4183 (voice)
atlasmail@usgs.gov

Metadata standard:
FGDC Content Standards for Digital Geospatial Metadata (FGDC-STD-001-1998)



 


Generated by mp version 2.8.16 on Wed Mar 29 16:13:38 2006